5 things you need to know before you deadlift

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One of the most favorite lifts of all big three for a strength athlete - the deadlift, is one of the most bio-mechanically active lifts." data-share-imageurl="">

Contributor: Melvin Cherian - http://getsetgo.fitness/#/public/coachprofile/melvin

Calculate your body fat% & get a diet plan - https://goo.gl/dnyH14

One of the most favorite lifts of all big three for a strength athlete - the deadlift, is one of the most bio-mechanically active lifts. You end up recruiting all the muscle fibers and all the joints in the body. But are we doing it absolutely right? Are we able to get the maximum benefit of hypertrophy, strength and functionality of the lift. If not, we have to understand and apply the following points into our deadlifts to make even more efficient:

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1. Stance

A lot of people prefer conventional deadlifts (hip stance) and in the recent times sumo deadlifts have gained a bit of attention too. Hip-width stance is the anatomical position of the body. Your body is most comfortable in its anatomical position hence the hip stance deadlift sounds to be a suitable choice for the deadlift. But that does not mean sumo is a wrong technique. As the distance between leg increases the body’s center of gravity shifts down further and makes the stance fall-free and stable. Base of supports widen up basically. Hence application wise-choose your pick. Everybody sets in different stances and finding what is comfortable and strong for you is the key. Sumo deadlift can actually be a good pick for someone who has just recovered from a back injury. The stronger you get here, the better you will be able to execute conventional deadlifts. If you want to particularly know which one to choose – train both hard for a while, then stick with whichever is strongest and most comfortable.

2. Tri-alignment

Tri-alignment refers to the alignment of the center of your foot, bar and the scapulae. All these three should be in a straight line to execute a perfect deadlift. The scientific reasoning behind this alignment is to ensure a stable launch position for the deadlift. When the scapula is ahead of the bar, the load pulled will force the entire body to topple ahead as the center of gravity gets disturbed. Also as the picture shows, if the alignment of scapulae, bar and center of the foot gets disturbed, the length of moment arm will increase and hence causing an increase in the tissue stress. So this justifies the importance of alignment of scapulae, center of foot and the bar.

3. Two things deadlift is all about

a) Driving your heels into the ground 

The force generation starts at the base of support. The base of support here is your foot. As you pull the bar up, your focus should be solely to drive your heels into the ground. If you let the load travel into the ground through the toes, you are likely to fall ahead with the weight.

b) Squeezing your glutes through the movement

A lot of people tend to hyperextend their back at the concentric end of the deadlift. This is hazardous. This might sooner or later lead into a multiple disc herniation as the hyperextended part of the deadlift causes the discs to compress at its posterior end. The idea is to squeeze your glutes on your way up. The entire back muscles work by default in a deadlifting action, the overlooked muscle which can get the advantage of getting work done is your glutes.

4. Lat involvement

Go back to the second point where you read about the alignment. How do you think your scapulae can be aligned in a straight line with the bar and center of the foot? It’s done by contracting your lats. When you engage/contract your lats, the scapula depresses and gets automatically aligned in the straight line. By doing this your shoulder girdle also tightens up as the pectoralis major and anterior-posterior- medial deltoid contracts to restrict the free mobility of your shoulder girdle to some extent to provide you with a firm chain to pull the weight up. This also ensures that you get the most work done by your posterior chain (back muscles, glute muscles and hamstring muscles).

5. Neutral spine and breathing pattern

Neutral spine simply means maintaining the natural curve of your spine while hinging at your hip to bend ahead to hold the bar. The cervical (neck), thoracic (upper back) and the lumbar (lower back) should be aligned properly in a straight line throughout the movement to ensure safety and an efficient lift. Imagine a truck that weighs in tonnes. The tires inflated with air withstand its weight. Once the air goes off, the metal rings on which tires are mounted comes into contact with the ground and starts to wear off as the truck moves. So in short, air has a lot of power. While doing any lift, be it, deadlift or squats or military press or bench press, you should inhale all the air you possibly can and hold it in your abdominal cavity and perform the lift. This makes sure that your core muscles are well embraced and tight enough to withstand the load. Once you finish the rep, exhale and punctuate for the next rep. Inhale and perform again. This ensures safety, tightness, efficiency and error-less execution.

Article written by - Melvin (http://getsetgo.fitness/#/public/coachprofile/melvin)

 

 

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Contributor: Melvin Cherian - http://getsetgo.fitness/#/public/coachprofile/melvin

Calculate your body fat% & get a diet plan - https://goo.gl/dnyH14

One of the most favorite lifts of all big three for a strength athlete - the deadlift, is one of the most bio-mechanically active lifts." data-share-imageurl="">